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WHY LIVE TOBACCO-FREE?


Tobacco use does nothing but make our lives harder. Smoking cigarettes can damage nearly EVERY part of our bodies. And smoking, even if it’s not every day, can shorten our lives.

Scroll to get the facts about how tobacco is harming our entire community.

WRECKS
OUR HEALTH

Our community continues to face serious health concerns, and tobacco brings additional unnecessary death and disease by hurting our bodies in so many ways. Even if you only smoke cigarettes on some nights, it can shorten your life. Scroll down for some of the negative health effects of smoking.​

THE
NICOTINE
TRAP

Smoking cigarettes threatens our freedom. It may not seem like a lot, but even that occasional cigarette while going out once or twice a week can lead to daily use. Keep reading to see the ways that smoking can take away your freedom.​

HURTS OUR
COMMUNITY

Tens of thousands of LGBT lives are lost every year to tobacco. That contributes to the 480,000 total people in the U.S. who are killed by smoking-related disease annually. In fact, smoking kills more Americans than AIDS, alcohol, car accidents, homicide, suicide, illegal drugs, and fires combined.

RUINS OUR
APPEARANCE

We were meant to shine. But smoking doesn’t just damage the inside of our bodies. It also takes a toll on the way we look. Keep reading to learn more about how using tobacco can harm your appearance.

VAPE:
NOT THAT
INNOCENT

Sorry (not sorry) to blow up their spot, but e-cigs and vapes aren’t nearly as harmless as they pretend to be. Many of them contain nicotine, AKA the highly addictive chemical famously found in cigarettes.

Even when they’re nicotine-free, these products can still expose you to cancer-causing chemicals like formaldehyde and acetaldehyde.

UNSAFE IN
ANY FORM

Cigarettes aren’t the only kind of tobacco product that can do you damage. Other tobacco products like hookah, cigars, and cigarillos are also harmful to your health. Tobacco products, no matter their shape or size, can lead to nicotine addiction and expose you to cancer-causing chemicals. Click each box below to see how these tobacco products can harm you.

Cigars and cigarillos can expose you to at least as much nicotine and carbon monoxide as cigs, not to mention they can also cause some of the same kinds of cancer.
As for hookah, research shows that smokers may absorb even more of the toxic chemicals found in cigarette smoke because hookah smoking sessions are longer. One hour of smoking hookah can produce as much smoke as 100 cigarettes.
TOXIC
CHEMICALS

Cigarette smoke can expose your body to 7,000+ chemicals, including more than 70 that can cause cancer. The chemicals in cigarette smoke reach your lungs quickly every time you inhale. Your blood then carries these toxic chemicals to every organ in your body, wreaking havoc now and later.

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